Seacoastonline.com featured my book along with a short interview. I hope it's clear: I think these stories of brave and courageous African American girls and women are striking and inspiring. My book broadens our understanding of the quest of African American children and youth for schooling, learning, and livelihood in the nineteenth-century North. Yes, I am the one writing and telling these stories, but they have always been there – in the archive, in newspapers and journals, in court records. I didn't technically discover them or even recover them; I share them--with care and insight.

I have a handful of upcoming events scheduled for this spring 2020, including a local radio interview (WJOP 96.3) in January and a book signing at Water Street Bookstore in Exeter, NH in February. Exciting!

I'll add more events as they get solidified.

I love talking about this book, specifically what brought me to this subject; my research and writing process; what ended up on the cutting room floor (so much); the loose ends that perplex me (and the research that I still do even though the book is published); and my next book project, which dives even deeper into the meaning of education for people of color in the nineteenth-century North.

Join me if you can at one of these events.